Posted in ELA, English, Humor, Lesson plans, Literature, Shakespeare, Shenanigans, Tools

Chapter 21: Roasted by the Bard

NOTE: This is the fourth in a series of four posts on easing your students into Elizabethan English without terrifying them.

You’ve taught your kids scansion. You’ve introduced them to Shakespeare’s poetry. You’ve given them a little taste of his humor. You’ve pushed them to think about his language. But they’re still not quiiiiiiiite convinced they’ll be able to understand his plays. He’s just too fancy.

Today is the day you take him down a peg or two. Continue reading “Chapter 21: Roasted by the Bard”

Posted in Dr. Seuss, ELA, English, Humor, Kinesthetic, Learning styles, Lesson plans, Literature, Poetry, Scansion, Shakespeare, Tactile, Whimsy

Chapter 18: Sam-I-Am(b)

NOTE: This is the first in a series of four posts on easing your students into Elizabethan English without terrifying them. 

I didn’t take any fun pictures of this next lesson, because I was too busy clapping (more on that in a minute), but as I prepare my sophomores for our Hamlet unit, I have to share my favorite trick for introducing kids to Shakespeare:

Let Dr. Seuss do it for you. Continue reading “Chapter 18: Sam-I-Am(b)”

Posted in Curriculum, ELA, English, Lesson plans, Literature, Reflection, Student-led learning

Chapter 14: Let the Kids Drive

If I could give new teachers just one piece of advice, it would be this:

Let the kids drive.

Yes, you’re the one with the degree in education. Yes, you’re the one who knows the Common Core standards. Yes, you’re the one who’s seen the blueprint for the flavor-of-the-week standardized test. But your kids are the ones who know themselves, and that might be more important. Trust them. Seize the teachable moments, and let the kids drive — the lesson, the unit, even the curriculum if necessary.

Here’s what that looks like in practice: Continue reading “Chapter 14: Let the Kids Drive”